Heroes and Villains – ANgela CarTEr (REVIEW)

March 22, 2019

I had read a few books by Carter. Seen a few videos. And was mildly amused by how she was labelled by so many as a feminist, in regards to the pseudo LOOK AT ME LOOK AT ME LOOK AT ME! feminist routine of the Now. I found marvel in her drawing together of classic […]

Milan Kundera – Immortality

May 5, 2018

A persian friend with moons for eyes mentioned the author’s name to me a while back…knowing I write and read prolifically, and eager to suggest someone I might like and find within his work inspiration. A noble, kind gesture… I didn’t seek out the wordsmith, waited instead for him to come to me. As he […]

Sophocles – The Theban Plays (Book Review)

March 9, 2018

The only previous Greek tragedy I had consumed before this was Medea, which proved far more inspiring and savage and intense than what I had expected. To some, perhaps there was a tragedy, but the carnage was so immense and startling, that there was little time for sympathy when stronger emotions of horror and aghast […]

The Miser and Other Plays – Moliere (Book Review)

December 23, 2017

I have long held a natural aversion to plays, which extends to the poetic outings of Homer and perhaps Dante, without any deep rooted reason to do so other than a suspicion that the focus on form takes the writing too far away from my own natural zeal to express life in words always with […]

Queen MArgot – Dumas (book review)

April 5, 2017

  Given I retain value in Count of Monte Cristo as a timeless classic, I have opted for a score of 3/5 yet had I not read of the wondrous, gruelling panoramic voyage of dear Edmund Dantes, and have no other work of Dumas as a benchmark, the appraisal of Queen Margot would have been […]

The Ring is Closed – Knut Hamsun

January 19, 2017

It is important to consider that Hamsun wrote this book towards the end of a life well lived yet one which was perhaps tended towards apathy, questioning the value of anything, as he felt his grasp of existence seeping away, day by day. Whilst there are clear parallels with running themes of his earlier novels; […]

Cesar Birotteau – Balzac (Book Review)

July 31, 2016

I am pained to ponder that this foulest of years, during which consistent calamity has been the order of every week, may have something to do with my long overdue delving into the genius of Balzac, which began in February with A Harlot High and Low and this afternoon reached the end of Cesar Birotteau. […]

charlize theron fury road

Mad Max – Fury Road (REVIEW)

October 8, 2015

I cannot recall at what age I was when I first saw the original Mad Max series. I was young. And they scared me, painted a brutal picture of Australia which has always stuck with me since. They had a vicious, fearful edge. Fast paced, shot in a way which made you feel you were […]

Red Riding Hood 2003 Giacomo Cimini Review

December 28, 2014

  With her father gunned down, her mother present whilst absent, the mischievous star of this story is a joy to behold. Stating her credo early doors as… “Now I know what I want – to improve my education, serve justice, reinstate truth, basically what my father would have wanted me to do.” What a […]

Killer Joe

April 21, 2014

I’ve never been a major or even minor fan of Mathew McConaughey. Neither of his face nor his acting. He has always struck me as a descendant of Skeletor or some other skull-faced bother…typecast into pretty boy roles in romantic comedies for The New Dumb to laugh at and smile at his curls, now and […]